Architect as a Service Part 1 – Gain the clarity required to make inspired decisions

For many customers, no matter their size, lack of visibility and clarity in direction are two of the top reason’s decisions cannot be made and value derived from current investments.  With this in mind, I’m excited to share with you our Architect as a Service (AaaS) which is resonating strongly with our partners and their clients.  Let me first start by giving some context to the problem the service seeks to address.

Many organisations have an overwhelming number of projects, technical directives, compliance requirements, existing contracts and new subscriptions to name but a few. All of which makes it very difficult to execute meaningful change. Add to this the consumption of (As a Service) such as SaaS, IaaS, PaaS or many more with the associated risks of ShadowIT and breach exposure, the problem becomes compounded. Most organisations end up in a position where they simply have too many services to understand or manage?

If you can’t see, you can’t manage, and if you can’t manage, how can you make informed decisions and work towards a strategic outcome?  How can you possibly hope to move forward in a controlled and successful manner, when services are being consumed across the business outside of policy or control? Or, from a security perspective, how can you be sure you adhere to the Australian Signals Directorate top 8 (ASD8) or other security directives?

Having a clear understanding of the existing technical landscape and changing or challenging business requirements is essential. Issues could include roadblocks in the business (technical or other) security and compliance requirements or simply a clear view as to how technology could be leveraged to improve the business.

Put yourself in the shoes of an executive in the business, and looking inwards, ask yourself these five questions:

  1. How can I be certain that I am getting the best possible ROI on my technology investments?
  2. For every decision we make, are we aware of the security implications and what our breach prevention posture looks like?
  3. Are we making the right technical decisions and for the right reasons?
  4. How can we be sure that we are leveraging what we are entitled to under our subscriptions and not doubling up?
  5. Why is my business not achieving the efficiencies that will allow us to stay ahead of the competition?

Now, after some reflection on the questions above, it is most likely there is uncertainty or doubt. I can’t tell you how many meetings I have been a part of where these questions have been asked and the resulting conversation typically ends up being a very tactical approach to a perceived or misunderstood problem. Once that happens it is often very difficult to pull the conversation out of the weeds and back up to the strategy level.

Enter ARCHITECT as a SERVICE (AaaS) which gaining significant traction. Why? Simple, it is a very attractive proposition to a team of executives looking to have the five preceding questions quantified or answered.

What is AaaS? – In its most basic form, AaaS is a fixed price engagement engaging senior stakeholders in the business (often executives CIO, CTO, CISO), delivered through a series of workshops, meetings, interviews, and interactive sessions. The intent of the sessions is to discuss the top questions, risks, and concerns, and to remove as much fear uncertainty and doubt (FUD) as possible. The deliverable from the AaaS sessions is a prioritised strategic roadmap showing tasks which can be completed rapidly for the quickest possible return, through to consulting and consumption activities which will drive the fastest possible time to value. The intent of the roadmap is to allow the executive sponsors to work in a collaborative manner with their partners and vendors to clearly understand business risks, mitigation strategies, and arrive at a timeline that will allow continuous improvement through project delivery whilst ensuring efficient consumption of existing entitlements that will drive successful business outcomes.

Example roadmap summary

Some of the feedback we have had on the sessions delivered has validated exactly what we set out to achieve. One customer commented:

CIO, Large Energy Company – “The time spent with your architect was invaluable. We were able to pick the bones out of what is not going well and where we were hemorrhaging money on technology that was either unfit for purpose, or obsolete, whilst on a more positive note, recognising benefits from entitlements under existing subscriptions that we were totally unaware of.”

So back to where I started, I am excited about this service as each time we get in front of an organisation I know we are truly adding value and helping individuals and their business gain clarity and create a path to move forward. In a socially connected digital world where the lines between people, process, and technology become more and more blurred, a trusted, and independent voice of reason is being very well received.

Please contact me for more details and an open conversation around how AaaS could clear the path and rapidly create a forward-looking plan.

Continue for Part 2 - AaaS

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